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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Arizona Finds Owning a Dog Provides Health Benefits for Postmenopausal Women

Working to identify effective strategies to increase physical activity among older adults, particularly women, University of Arizona researchers have identified dog ownership as a key to better health. The findings were published in the journal Preventive Medicine, Volume 70.

Garcia
[Photo: Dr. David O. Garcia]

Regular physical activity can positively affect health outcomes in older adults, but only half of the older adults in the United States meet the current recommendation of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week. To identify effective strategies to increase physical activity in older women, researchers at the UA Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health analyzed data from a diverse sample of nearly 160,000 postmenopausal women who were enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial or observational study.

The study, which focused on women ages 50-79 and WHI data gathered between 1993 and 1998, found that dog ownership was associated with a 14-percent increase of walking more than 150 minutes per week, compared to women who did not own dogs. The data also showed that living alone substantially modified the relationship between dog ownership and physical activity outcomes, particularly for walking and sedentary time.  Among women who reported living alone, dog owners were 29 percent more likely to walk more than 150 minutes per week and 23 percent less likely to be sedentary more than eight hours per day, compared to those who did not own dogs.

“While relationships between dog ownership and physical activity have previously been studied in older women, the sample size and population diversity were limited. The WHI data allowed us to expand upon previous research, using data collected for dog ownership, walking and total physical activity, as well as sedentary time,” said lead author Dr. David O. Garcia,American College of Sports Medicine exercise physiologist with the Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention and Health Promotion at the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health and a postdoctoral fellow at the UA Cancer Center’s Cancer Prevention and Control Program.

Read more: https://publichealth.arizona.edu/news/2015/ua-study-finds-owning-dog-provides-health-benefits-postmenopausal-women