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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Arizona Study Examines Agribusiness, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Health of Agricultural Migrant Workers

Living conditions and health of migrant farmworkers could benefit from a health promotion model based on corporate social responsibility (CSR) according to a study by researchers at the Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. and the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. The study is published in Frontiers in Public Health.

To understand how Mexican agribusiness owners and general managers view and practice CSR, the researchers interviewed eight agribusiness owners/managers and 233 farmworkers using open-ended interviews and gathered anthropometrical data of 133 children from farmworkers families. To guide the analysis and discussion, the team followed the two-dimension model of CSR proposed by Quazi and O’Brien.

According to interviewee responses, mean percentage of agreement with CSR concept was 77.4 percent, with a range of 54–85.7 percent. Main health-related issues among farmworkers were infectious diseases, crowding, and access to health-care services; there were acute cases of undernutrition among farmworkers’ children and diets were of poor quality.

The researchers conclude that Agribusiness owners and managers understand and practice CSR according to a wide and modern view, which contradicts with farmworkers’ living conditions and health. Quazi and O’Brien model should consider the social context, in which it is analyzed, and the social manifestations of community development as a tool for further analysis on the perceptions and actions of entrepreneurs.

Agribusiness, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Health of Agricultural Migrant Workers

Frontiers in Public Health, March 29.

Link:  http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00054/full