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Columbia Immunization Initiatives

Community-Based Program in Nigeria Leads to Soaring Immunization Rates – Maternal and child health outcomes in Nigeria are among the worst in the world. With survival rates for infants and children showing little signs of improvement and routine vaccination coverage remaining low, the Partnership for Reviving Routine Immunization in Northern Nigeria – Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health was established to reduce mortality for both mothers and children. A study led by Dr. Sally Findley, professor of clinical sociomedical sciences and population and family health at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, with collaboration of Dr. Henry Doctor, secretary general for Union for African Population Studies (UAPS), “Changes in Maternal and Child Health Care Behaviors: Early evidence of the impact of community-based programs,” measured the impact of the changes underway to reduce mortality rates. Results to date indicate a significant improvement in key outcomes including a rise in the anti-tetanus vaccination rate and a reduction in incidence of tetanus among newborns.