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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

CUNY Faculty Reports on a National Sample of Gay and Bisexual Men in the U.S.

Dr. Christian Grov, a professor at the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy with colleagues from Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training published their findings on the characteristics associated with urethral and rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia diagnoses in a national sample of gay and bisexual men in the United States. The work was published in Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

Gay and bisexual men are at elevated risk for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Rectal symptoms may be less obvious than urethral, increasing opportunities for undiagnosed disease. Data came from the One Thousand Strong Panel, a U.S. national sample of gay and bisexual men.

In total, 6.2 percent were positive for gonorrhea and chlamydia (5.3 percent rectal, 1.7 percent urethral). The odds ratios were adjusted for education, race, age, relationship status, having health insurance, and income. Age was inversely associated with urethral and rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia. Compared with White men, Latinos had significantly greater odds of rectal disease. Among men who reported anal sex, those reporting only insertive sex had lower odds of rectal than did men who reported both insertive and receptive. There was a positive association between rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia and number of male partners (<12 months), the number of anal receptive acts, receptive condomless anal sex acts, and insertive condomless anal sex acts. Compared with those who had engaged in both insertive and receptive anal sex, those who engaged in only receptive anal sex had lower odds of urethral gonorrhea and chlamydia. The number of male partners (<12 months) was associated with increased odds of urethral gonorrhea and chlamydia.

Dr. Christian Grov
[Photo: Dr. Christian Grov]

Rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia was more common than urethral and associated with some demographic and behavioral characteristics. Our finding that insertive condomless anal sex acts was associated with rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia highlights that providers should screen patients via a full range of transmission routes, lest patients go undiagnosed.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26859803

Dr. Christian Grov, a professor at the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy with colleagues published their findings on how men who do not know their HIV status differ from those who do. The work was published in AIDS Behavior.

The research team compared self-described HIV-positive (31.6  percent, n = 445), HIV-negative (56.8 percent, n = 801), and HIV-unknown (11.6 percent, n = 164) gay and bisexual men on sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics. Participants from across the U.S. were enrolled via a popular sexual networking website to complete an online survey. In total, 44.8 percent of HIV-negative and HIV-unknown men said they had not been tested for HIV in the last six months, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV-unknown men significantly differed from HIV-negative and HIV-positive men in sexual behavior and HIV status disclosure patterns. HIV-unknown men were more willing than HIV-negative men to take pre-exposure prophylaxis; however, HIV-unknown men were significantly less likely than others to have health insurance or a primary care provider. Given the observed differences, researchers should consider analyzing data on men who are HIV-unknown separately from HIV-negative and HIV-positive men.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26767536