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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Georgia State: Psychosocial Correlates of Self-reported HIV Among Youth in the Slums of Kampala

A study in BMC Public Health by a team of public health researchers at Georgia State University School of Public Health addresses the high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the youth living in the slums of Kampala, Uganda and the dire need of interventions which address both alcohol use behaviors and sexual risk behaviors to reduce further complications of their existing health conditions, including HIV.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) rates are high in Uganda (6.7 percent), and rates are especially high among at-risk groups such as youth living in the slums of Kampala, Uganda. 

The purpose of the study was to determine the demographic characteristics, high-risk sexual behaviors, alcohol-related behaviors, and gender differences associated with self-reported HIV among youth living in the slums of Kampala, Uganda. 

Additionally, the researchers sought to identify the associated factors with HIV among youth living in the slums of Kampala in the multivariable framework. The HIV prevalence among youth living in the slums of Kampala is higher than the national average (10.5 percent vs. 6.5 percent, respectively).  Among youth living in the slums, the HIV epidemic is being fueled by alcohol use and alcohol-related sexual behaviors.

Read more.

By Dr. Monica Swahn
Distinguished University Professor
Epidemiology and Public Health
Georgia State University

Dr. Rachel Culbreth
Assistant Professor
Respiratory Therapy
Georgia State University

Dr. Laura Salazar
Professor
Health Promotion and Behavior
Georgia State University

et al.

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