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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Georgia State: Study Suggests HIV Infections In U.S. Could Be Reduced By Up To 67 Percent By 2030

New human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in the United States could be substantially reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030 if ambitious goals for HIV care and treatment are met and targeted prevention interventions for people at risk for HIV are rapidly scaled up, according to a study by the Georgia State University School of Public Health and the University at Albany-SUNY.

The federal administration recently announced a goal to reduce new HIV infections by 90 percent in the next 10 years during the 2019 State of the Union address. This study shows the goal is unlikely to be achieved, but that it is possible to substantially reduce new HIV infections in the next decade with innovative models for delivering HIV care and prevention interventions and sufficient investments to bring them to scale.

The researchers analyzed the latest HIV surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and estimated how many new HIV infections could be averted through ambitious, but attainable, national HIV prevention goals.

They predict that meeting internationally accepted targets for HIV diagnosis and care by 2025 and preventing an additional 20 percent of transmissions through targeted interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people with HIV risk would enable the U.S. to reduce new HIV infections by 67 percent in the next decade.

Read the study.

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