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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Harvard Finds Significant Decline in Deaths after Massachusetts’ Health Reform

In the first four years after Massachusetts instituted comprehensive health reform in 2006, mortality in the state decreased by 2.9 percent compared with similar populations in states that did not expand health coverage, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. They estimated that Massachusetts’ health reform law, which provided near-universal coverage, has prevented approximately 320 deaths per year – one life saved for each 830 people gaining insurance. The study – which provides new scientifically rigorous analysis of whether health insurance expansion can save lives – appears in Annals of Internal Medicine.