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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Johns Hopkins: Antidepressant Harms Baby Neurons in Lab-Grown “Mini-Brains”

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have demonstrated the use of stem cell-derived “mini-brains” to detect harmful side effects of a common drug on the developing brain. Mini-brains are miniature human brain models, developed with human cells and barely visible to the human eye, whose cellular mechanisms mimic those of the developing human brain.

The scientists, who will publish their findings on February 21 in Frontiers of Cellular Neuroscience, used the mini-brains to determine that the common antidepressant paroxetine suppresses the growth of synapses, or connection points between neurons, and leads to significant decreases in an important support-cell population. Paroxetine is sold under the brand names Paxil and Seroxat, among others.

Paroxetine, which can cross the placenta in pregnant women, currently comes with a warning against use in early pregnancy, largely due to a known risk of heart and lung defects. Some epidemiological studies also have suggested that paroxetine raises the risk of autism. The new findings are likely to heighten concerns about the effects of this drug, and others in its class, on the developing brain.

The study authors say that the findings suggest that lab-grown mini-brains, which they call BrainSpheres, are a good alternative to traditional animal testing. In particular, they can reveal drugs and other chemicals that are harmful to young brains.

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