Connect

Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Johns Hopkins: Diet Designed to Lower Blood Pressure Also Reduces Risk of Kidney Disease

People who ate a diet high in nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables and low in red and processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium were at a significantly lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease over the course of more than two decades, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

The diet, known as DASH for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, was designed to help reduce blood pressure, but research has shown it to be effective in preventing a series of other chronic illnesses including cardiovascular disease. The findings, published online August 9 in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, suggest that kidney disease now can be added to that list.

“In addition to offering other health benefits, consuming a DASH-style diet could help reduce the risk of developing kidney disease,” says study leader Dr. Casey M. Rebholz, an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins. “The great thing about this finding is that we aren’t talking about a fad diet. This is something that many physicians already recommend to help prevent chronic disease.”

Researchers estimate kidney disease affects 10 percent of the U.S. population — more than 20 million people. Less than one in five who have it are aware that they do, however.

Read more: http://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2016/diet%20-designed-to-lower-blood-pressure-also-reduces-risk%20of-kidney-disease.html