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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Johns Hopkins: Following Home Injuries to Young Children, Parents Make Changes to Reduce Subsequent Injuries

A study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the majority—nearly two-thirds—of parents whose young children had been treated in an emergency room for an unintentional home injury made modifications to avoid subsequent injuries.

The study, led by Dr. Vanya Jones, assistant professor in the Bloomberg School’s department of health, behavior and society, was published as a research letter in JAMA Pediatrics.

For the study, the research team, which included Dr. Andrea Gielen, professor in the Bloomberg School’s department of health, behavior and society, conducted home interviews with parents of 104 children aged six months to seven years who had experienced 123 injuries that were treated at the emergency room in 2012. A majority of parents identified at least one prevention strategy—82 percent—while 59 percent made actual modifications.

Of the 110 suggested strategies, 40 percent were to create a safer environment and 29 percent were to provide increased adult supervision while 3.9 percent were to modify child behavior.

The authors note that parents’ endorsement of environmental modification is encouraging because this approach is a preferred injury prevention strategy. They also note that while evidence suggests that supervision can reduce injuries to young children, research is required to address the many challenges parents face in these efforts.

Read more:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/2704488?utm_source=silverchair&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=article_alert-jamapediatrics&utm_content=olf&utm_term=100818