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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Johns Hopkins: Range of Opioid Prescribers Play Important Role in Epidemic

A cross-section of opioid prescribers that typically do not prescribe large volumes of opioids, including primary care physicians, surgeons and non-physician health care providers, frequently prescribe opioids to high-risk patients, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The findings suggest that high-volume prescribers, including “pill mill” doctors, should not be the sole focus of public health efforts to curb the opioid abuse epidemic.

The study also found that “opioid shoppers,” patients who obtain prescriptions from multiple doctors and pharmacies, are much less common than other high-risk patient groups, suggesting why policy solutions focused on these patients have not yielded larger reductions in opioid overdoses.

“This crisis has been misconstrued as one involving just a small subset of doctors and patients,” says senior author Dr. G. Caleb Alexander, associate professor in the department of epidemiology at the Bloomberg School and founding co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness. “Our results underscore the need for targeted interventions aimed at all opioid prescribers, not just high-volume prescribers alone.”

The study, which will be published on Nov. 29 in Addiction, comes as America’s opioid crisis continues to worsen. Opioids include not only the recreational, poppy-derived drug heroin, but also many newer and much more potent synthetic painkillers available by prescription, such as fentanyl and oxycodone. Opioids tend to be highly addictive and when overdosed can stop a user from breathing. Drug overdose deaths in the U.S., which now mostly involve opioids, surged from about 52,000 in 2015 to more than 64,000 in 2016.

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