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Faculty & Staff Honors

Faculty & Staff Honors

Johns Hopkins Researchers Receive $890,000 CDC Grant to Evaluate Medicaid Expansion’s Impact on Prevention of Violence

Dr. Elizabeth Letourneau, professor in the department of mental health and director of the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Dr. Beth McGinty, associate professor in the Bloomberg School’s department of health policy and management, received a $890,000 three-year grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to advance the understanding of what works to prevent violence in low-income communities.

Violence, including child abuse and neglect, youth violence, and intimate partner violence plagues many American families, particularly those who reside in low-income communities. This imposes a significant health burden on victims and a large economic burden on the country. Prevention efforts typically intervene on a single type of violence at the individual or family level, but research is needed to identify policies that prevent multiple forms of violence at scale.

The researchers will study the effects of Medicaid expansion on the primary prevention of violence. The research will advance the understanding of what works to prevent violence in low-income communities. Results should be of particular relevance to policy makers in the 18 states that did not expand Medicaid, many whom are actively considering adoption of this policy.

This study is the first to examine the impacts of Medicaid expansion on violence. For 30 years, Dr. Letourneau has conducted research involving the evaluation of policy and practice related to child sexual abuse and to youth violence and other risk behaviors, youth sexual offending, substance use, and sexual risk taking. operating at macrosystem levels that prevent multiple forms of violence at scale. Dr. McGinty has extensive expertise with Medicaid policy issues and is leading a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health examining the effects of the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Health Home provision on access to and quality of care among Medicaid beneficiaries with serious mental illness.