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Student & Alumni Achievements

Student & Alumni Achievements

Memphis Doctoral Student Investigates Access to Services Linked to Electronic Health Records (EHR) Systems

Dr. Asos Mahmood, a PhD candidate in health systems management & policy at the University of Memphis School of Public Health, has authored an article in Hospital Topics Journal. His research entitled “Association between Having a Regular Health Provider and Access to Services Linked to Electronic Health Records” examines the association between having a regular healthcare provider and access to healthcare services linked to electronic health records (EHR) systems and patient portals. Dr. Mahmood is co-authored by Dr. Kavita Mosalpuria from the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, Dr. David K. Wyant from the Jack C. Massey College of Business, Belmont University, and Dr. Soumitra Bhuyan from the University of Memphis School of Public Health. Dr. Mahmood and his colleagues also looked at the other patients’ predisposing, enabling and need factors that influence access to healthcare services linked to EHR systems.

[Photo: Dr. Asos Mahmood]

A regular care provider, or a usual source of care, is a significant measure of access to healthcare services yet, it is not well understood how having a regular provider is associated with patients’ access to services linked to EHR systems. The researchers utilized data from the National Cancer Institute’s Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS5-Cycle1, 2017, n = 3,285). From a multivariate regression model, they found that survey respondents with a regular healthcare provider had significantly greater odds of access to services linked to EHR (Adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.91, p < .001) compared to participants without a regular care provider. In addition, respondents were more likely to have access to an EHR if they were “females (aOR 1.56, p < .01), had a tablet computer (aOR 1.55, p < .05), smartphone (aOR 2.27, p < .01), a former smoker (aOR 1.67, p < .05) or had two or more chronic medical conditions (aOR 1.79, p < .01).” Their findings shed light on the importance of regular care providers and the authors conclude that having a regular provider would potentially impact the “digital divide” that already exists in the United States and it might address part of disparities in access to services linked to EHR systems.

Hospital Topics is a peer-reviewed, U.S. based, journal that has published on healthcare issues since 1922. The journal publishes on “information systems, fatigue management, medication errors, nursing compensation, midwifery, job satisfaction among managers, team building, and bringing primary care to rural areas.”