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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Northwestern: Device That Protects Against HIV, Pregnancy Enters Clinical Trial

Women’s reproductive health may never be the same, thanks to Northwestern University biomedical engineer Dr. Patrick Kiser, faculty member in the department of biomedical engineering at the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science and in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and his first-of-its-kind intravaginal ring that reliably delivers an antiretroviral drug and a contraceptive for months. Dr. Kiser’s one ring delivers two drugs that do three important things: the device is designed to protect against HIV and herpes as well as unwanted pregnancy. It will be the first device with the potential to offer this protection to be tested in women. The easy-to-use ring delivers controlled doses of tenofovir (a common antiretroviral drug) and levonorgestrel (a contraceptive) for 90 days. The rings are being manufactured now, and the device soon will undergo its first test in women.