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PHR Article of the Week: Accuracy of Parental Reports of Children’s HPV Vaccine Status: Implications for Estimates of Disparities, 2009-2010

In the latest issue of Public Health Reports, May/June 2014, University of Minnesota doctoral student Ms. Laura Attanasio and faculty member Dr. Donna McAlpine bring to light the accuracy of parental reports of children’s HPV vaccine status: Implications for estimates of disparities, 2009-2010.

Since the introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in 2006, there have been considerable efforts at the national and state level to monitor uptake and better understand the individual and system-level factors that predict who gets vaccinated. A common method of measuring the vaccination status of adolescents is through parental recall. The study examined how the accuracy of parents’ reports of their daughters’ HPV vaccination status varied by social characteristics.

In bivariate analyses, concordance of parent-reported HPV vaccine initiation was associated with each of the sociodemographic characteristics investigated. In regression models, self-reported non-White race, lower household income, and lower education level of the teen’s mother were associated with a higher likelihood of having a false-negative parental report than a concordant report. These analyses concluded that while estimates of overall coverage based on parental report may be unbiased, the differences in the accuracy of parental report could result in misleading estimates of disparities in HPV vaccine coverage.

This week’s PHR feature article, Accuracy of Parental Reports of Children’s HPV Vaccine Status: Implications for Estimates of Disparities, 2009-2010  will be open access through June 26, 2014. For full access to current content, visit the Public Health Reports website to subscribe.