Connect

Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

South Carolina: Researchers Examine Ways of Coping and Perceived HIV-related Stigma Among People Living With HIV

Dr. Monique J. Brown, assistant professor of epidemiology with the South Carolina SmartState Center for Healthcare Quality and Rural and Minority Health Research Center at the University of South Carolina Arnold School of Public Health, has published a study on ways of coping and HIV disclosure among people living with HIV by looking at moderation by sex and sexual orientation. The research was published in the journal, Psychology, Health & Medicine.

“Perceived HIV-related stigma continues to persist among people living with HIV and coping strategies are crucial to overall health,” says Dr. Brown. “Coping may be associated with perceived HIV-related stigma. However, research examining differences by sex and sexual orientation is lacking.”

With this study, the researchers assessed the association between ways of coping and perceived HIV-related stigma and examined the relationship by sex and sexual orientation. They analyzed data from 346 individuals living with HIV.

Dr. Brown and her team found that overall, distancing, and attack/escape avoidance coping were positively associated with perceived HIV-related stigma among the overall population, among men who have sex with men and among women overall and heterosexual women. Further, among men overall, distancing and attack/escape avoidance coping were positively associated with perceived HIV-related stigma. Among women who have sex with women, attack/escape avoidance coping was positively associated with perceived HIV-related stigma.

Full article

Tags: ,