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Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

Texas A&M Finds High Rate of Childhood Hunger among Mexican-origin Families

A recent study shows alarming rates of child hunger among children of Mexican immigrants. The Program for Research and Outreach-Engagement on Nutrition and Health Disparities at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Rural Public Health also identified economic and family factors that increased the odds for child hunger as well as community strategies that reduced the odds among Mexican-origin families who reside in Texas border colonias. The study lead by Dr. Joseph Sharkey, professor in the department of health promotion and community health sciences and founding director of the program, used 2009 Colonia Household and Community Food Resource Assessment (C-HCFRA) data from 470 mothers who were randomly recruited by promotora-researchers. Dr. Sharkey and his team identified hunger among children in 51 percent of households in this C-HCFRA sample.