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The Community Preventive Services Task Force New Recommendation

Have you wondered if diet and physical activity programs really help prevent or control type 2 diabetes? Then keep reading, because the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) released an evidence-based recommendation in favor of programs that actively encourage those at increased risk for type 2 diabetes to eat healthier and be more physically active.

What is the Task Force’s Recommendation?

The Task Force recommends combined diet and physical activity promotion programs for people at increased risk of type 2 diabetes based on strong evidence of effectiveness in reducing new-onset diabetes. Combined diet and physical activity promotion programs also increase the likelihood of reverting to normoglycemia (normal blood sugar) and improve diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including overweight, high blood glucose, high blood pressure, and abnormal lipid profile.

Program participants may be considered at increased risk of type 2 diabetes if they have blood glucose levels that are abnormally elevated, but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes.1 Participants may also be identified using validated predictive diabetes risk scores.

The Task Force also concluded from the economic evidence that combined diet and physical activity promotion programs to prevent type 2 diabetes among people at increased risk, are cost-effective.

These effectiveness and economic reviews were conducted — with oversight from the Task Force — by scientists and subject matter experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with a wide range of government, academic, policy, and practice-based partners.

The following articles about combined diet and physical activity programs for people at increased risk of type 2 diabetes appear in the July 2015 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine:

Also, a summary of the findings and supporting materials are available on The Community Guide website. You can also subscribe External Web Site Icon to be notified when additional materials are posted.

1People are classified as being at increased risk of type 2 diabetes if their blood glucose levels are abnormally elevated but still below the threshold for the disease. People at increased risk of diabetes have hemoglobin levels between 5.7 percent and 6.4 percent, fasting plasma glucose between 100 and 125 mg/dL, or plasma glucose between 140 and 199 mg/dL after a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test (American Diabetes Association, 2010).

What are “combined diet and physical activity promotion programs”?

Combined diet and physical activity promotion programs aim to prevent type 2 diabetes among people who are at increased risk of the disease. These programs actively encourage people to improve their diet and increase their physical activity using the following:

Why is the Task Force Recommendation Important?

The number of people with diabetes and prediabetes continues to increase. It is critical that new cases of diabetes are prevented. The current facts are clear (CDC):

What are the Task Force and The Community Guide?