Connect

Member Research and Reports

Member Research and Reports

UCLA Report Says Pesticide Regulation in California is Flawed

A new report shows that in at least one case, the system failed by approving a pesticide called methyl iodide for use on strawberries. Methyl iodide is both a neurotoxicant and a carcinogen. Approximately 30 million pounds of fumigant pesticides are used each year on soil that yields valuable California crops – strawberries, tomatoes, peppers and the like – in an attempt to control pests. Responsibility for the safety of pesticides must be evaluated and approved by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation in a process known as registration. A new report issued by University of California at Los Angeles’s Sustainable Technology and Policy Program, a joint program of the Fielding School of Public Health and the School of Law, shows that in at least one case, the system failed by approving a chemical called methyl iodide for use on strawberries.