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Faculty & Staff Honors

Faculty & Staff Honors

UTHealth Awarded Nearly $5.7 Million for Cancer Research and Prevention

The Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded nearly $5.7 million in grants to The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. The grants will fund projects that train innovative cancer researchers, increase breast and cervical cancer screening among Hispanics and raise awareness about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

Roberta Ness, Patricia Dolan Mullen, Lara Savas and Maria E. Fernandez.
[Photo: (left to right) Drs. Roberta Ness, Patricia Dolan Mullen, Lara Savas and Maria E. Fernandez]

Collaborative training of innovative cancer researchers

Dr. Roberta Ness, vice president for innovation at UTHealth and James W. Rockwell Professor of Public Health at UTHealth School of Public Health, and Dr. Patricia Dolan Mullen, distinguished teaching professor and president’s scholar at the School of Public Health, received $4 million to support the Innovation for Cancer Prevention Research (ICPR) fellowship, a unique training program for cancer prevention researchers.

Breast and cervical cancer screening among Hispanic women

Dr. Lara Savas, assistant professor in the department of health promotion and behavioral sciences and the Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research at the School of Public Health, received a $1.38 million grant to expand a program aimed at increasing breast and cervical screening as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among Hispanic women.

Increasing HPV vaccination rates across Texas

Dr. Maria E. Fernandez, professor in the department of health promotion and behavioral sciences and director of the Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research at the School of Public Health, received an award of $299,778 to continue her work on cervical cancer prevention.

The HPV vaccine provides protection against HPV infection and 90 percent of cervical cancers. If used correctly, the vaccine has the potential to decrease cervical cancer-related health disparities among Hispanics, according to Dr. Fernandez.

Read the full story here.